Chaos Theory, Tension, and Lincoln

17 Jun

Chaos, tension, and strife. These are three things that,  if given the option, we’d attempt to eliminate  from everyday life. There are those exceptional individuals, however, who  find ways to not only cope, but thrive in the midst of chaos. One such individual who comes to mind is Lincoln. Yep, good ‘ol Honest Abe.

Abraham Lincoln, during his tenure as our nation’s leader exemplified expert  management of chaos, tension, and among other things, a war. Lincoln has been described by some as  a Master of Paradox. This point is beautifully illustrated in  of my favorite professional titles:

  • Lincoln on Leadership, by D. Phillips

In this text, Phillips paints a picture of Lincoln in which he mastered the art of paradoxical leadership. Lincoln led his constituents, his troops, and a nation by being unyielding yet flexible. Demanding yet compassionate. A risk-taker yet calculated. Authoritative yet collaborative.  So how was it that Lincoln managed… the chaos, the tension, and strife?  How should we deal with the chaos and tension in our professional lives? Why does is take us so many college degrees, text books, and seminars to figure this out, when Lincoln had this under control way back in the day?

I believe the answer is simple. It’s  because of one thing Lincoln did  better than the rest of us. He  understood people. Did you get that? Lincoln really got it.  Lincoln listened. Lincoln walked with the troops. Lincoln had compassion.  Lincoln just plain rocked.

So, what’s the lesson for us? What are we as educators, school administrators, and  parents to do? First, be like Abe. You  must know who you’re leading. Walk with the troops now and then. Lend them your ear. Listen to what’s important. Know your audience, and perhaps someday, you too with be a master of paradox.  But then again, at the very least,  let’s just hope that chaos, tension, and strive won’t throw you for a loop.

I wish you the best in excellence and instruction.

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