Why Another Staff Meeting?

19 Jun

Author Scott Snair describes  the one-on-one  meeting as a “powerful personal vehicle of influence.” This is brilliant, and really a no-brainer in my book. We know that personal interaction is far more meaningful than the whole group-time-sucking-wheel-spinning-stuck-in-the-mud staff meeting. So, why do we continually insist on a culture of traditional staff meetings in the world of K-12 education?

One book I’ve turned to for inspiration, gems of wisdom, and just no-nonsense goodness is the following:

  • The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Motivational Leadership, by Scott Snair

In this text Mr. Snair, a West Point Naval Academy alum, gulf war veteran, and among other things, a leader in the business world, shares the following guidelines for staff meeting criteria. He references an earlier text of his: Stop the Meeting, I Want to Get Off! in which he proposes  a list of questions to answer to help determine  if, a meeting is necessary, or unavoidable. Here’s the punchline:

  1. Are you holding the meeting because that’s the way it’s always been done? Are you giving in to  status quo?
  2. Could the dynamics of the group actually derail the overall  progress?
  3. Can this information be replaced by walking around and talking to folks, on-on-one?
  4. Can this meeting  be replaced by mentoring of individuals?
  5. Can this meeting be replaced by strong leadership?
  6. Can this meeting be replaced by better utilizing organization resources?
  7. Can this meeting be replaced by delegating?
  8. Can this meeting be replaced by better use of information  technology or communication?
  9. Is the meeting being asked by another higher up? Can you deny the request appropriately?

So, after reviewing these questions, you ask if the meeting is 100% percent necessary. If so, then you make it happen.  The next steps include ensuring that you actually follow through with an effective meeting–and clearly understand why most meetings fail, but that’s another post. Keep rolling these questions around in your rock tumbler. I wish you well on you efforts toward planning, executing, and following through with  efficient and effective staff  meetings.

I wish you the best in excellence and instruction.

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