Make Learning the Bottom Line

23 Jun

Today’s world of education is dynamic, challenging, and ever-changing. Every day we serve millions of children in hopes of meeting social, academic, and learning needs.  Individuals in today’s educational system often feel driven by legislation, state mandates, authoritative boards, and the all-mighty greenback. Any educator, who’s been out of (teacher) college more than a mere nanosecond, understands this powerful concept. As we strive to do so much with so little, it’s tempting to feel the pressure, the crunch, and the squeeze. All this can leave us asking, what’s our bottom line?

In the traditional business sense, the standard bottom line is money.  This model is a familiar to us, as it’s a model in which our systems of business, government, and education have been based upon for centuries. The interesting thing is, despite this system which drives our engines, I know money really isn’t everything. I believe our true bottom line is what we value, what we believe in, and the decisions we make which impact children—despite having the fiscal resources. In short, I know our future of education depends on our ability to make a series of good decision which results in student success.  This success will be determined by our ability to keep student, and adult learning,  at the center of all that we do.

As I strive to hold on to learning as my bottom line, I  crack open a well-worn, dog-eared,  “go-to” professional text:

  • Leading Learning Communities (2nd edition 2008), published by the National Association of Elementary School Principals.

In this text you will find an in-depth description of Principal Standards,  and descriptors for self-assessing your current implementation level of these standards.  The following 5 key elements (and my translation)  break down just this one primary learning standard into actionable items. Each element describes principal practice which supports the learning process for our children, and the adults who educate them:

  1. Stay informed of the continually changing context for teaching and learning. Translation: Keep up with the current. Swim, paddle the rapids, and know what’s going on in education.
  2. Embody learner-centered leadership. Translation: Make no excuses. Support a community in which everybody learns. Period.
  3. Capitalize on the leadership of others. Translation:  Surround yourself by knowledgeable, professional “rock-stars,” and let them be leaders. Believe in your teachers, and let them shine!
  4. Align operations to support student, adult, and school learning needs. Translation: Have the courage to challenge status-quo, and align resources toward high-impact behaviors which ensure student learning every day.
  5. Advocate for efforts to ensure that policies are aligned to effective teaching and learning. Translation: Know your community, know your stakeholders and engage in dialogue, advocacy, and action which matters to student, families, and educators.

So, now that we know the experts attest to the benefits of keeping student and adult learning front and center, what are we to do?  Knowing the research is only the first step. The real impact is realized only when we put the learning, or knowing, into action.  Be courageous in using these 5 key points in your work as a school leader. May you journey well on the path of student success, and be unwavering in your commitment toward leading as if learning is your bottom line.

I wish you the best in excellence and instruction.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: